Waivers – Aquatic Facility

A waiver is a written agreement between SNHD and the permit holder that authorizes a modification of one or more regulatory requirements and has no impact on the health and safety of patrons. A waiver may be granted by modifying or waiving the requirements of the Aquatic Facility Regulations if public health and safety will not be impacted as a result of the approved waiver.

2019-07-16T09:21:12+00:00

Aquatic Facility Forms and Documentation

The Aquatic Facility Regulations require recordkeeping of qualified operator weekly visits as well as safety and maintenance inspections, and have requirements for various facility plans and documents. The forms below will assist with operation and maintenance of your aquatic venues.

2019-07-15T17:27:58+00:00

Requirements During a Boil Water Advisory

Notify and educate employees about emergency procedures before such an event occurs. Have a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) document for employees; it should include the correct contact information for the local water purveyor. Employees need to know the emergency procedures in the SOP prior to an actual event; so, conduct training on what to do.

2019-06-28T10:46:44+00:00

Parasite Destruction

All living organisms, including fish, can have parasites. Parasites are a natural occurrence and are not necessarily due to contamination. Parasites are killed during the cooking process and therefore do not present a health concern in thoroughly-cooked fish. Parasites become a concern when consumers eat raw, undercooked, or lightly-preserved fish (e.g., sashimi, sushi, or ceviche). Freezing, as required under the 2010 Regulations, kills any parasites that may be present.

2019-06-28T10:43:13+00:00

Food Donations

The SNHD 2010 Regulations Governing the Sanitation of Food Establishments (Regulations) apply to all food stored in a permitted establishment. The Regulations do not specifically address food for donation. Food donated to a food bank or other permit exempt charitable organization is no longer under the SNHD regulations when it leaves the permitted establishment.

2019-06-28T10:39:57+00:00

Emergency Loss of Utility Services and Other Imminent Health Hazards

An imminent health hazard (IHH) is a condition that greatly increases the chances of illness or injury to both the workers and the customers of a food establishment. Common examples of an IHH include: Fire, flooding, loss of pressurized water, loss of hot water, loss of power, broken refrigeration, floor drains backing-up/or unable to drain, pest infestation, unsanitary conditions; or, the onset of a suspected foodborne illness outbreak. Think of an emergency or a utility outage as an IHH. An IHH creates an unsafe environment for food preparation or service.

2019-06-28T10:49:23+00:00

Consumer Advisory

Animal food products that are served raw or undercooked present a significantly increased risk of causing a foodborne illness (i.e, “food poisoning”) because they have not been cooked to kill disease-causing germs. Food establishments that serve these types of foods must inform customers of this increased risk of illness by providing a consumer advisory on their menus.

2019-06-28T10:48:06+00:00

Cleaning and Sanitizing

What is the difference between cleaning and sanitizing? Cleaning is the removal of food, soil, and other types of debris from a surface. By itself, cleaning does not consistently reduce contamination to safe levels. Therefore, food-contact surfaces should be sanitized after being cleaned. Sanitizing reduces the number of illness-causing germs to acceptable levels. Cleaning and sanitizing should be done as often as necessary to prevent the cross-contamination of food.

2019-06-28T10:26:08+00:00

Certifications and Registration

Qualified operators are required to have completed a certification course recognized by the SNHD and maintain a current certification. Qualified Operator Training Courses must be in accordance with the criteria outlined in the most current MAHC published by the CDC.

2019-05-29T09:21:07+00:00

Lighting Requirements

Temporary aquatic venues open at night must meet the lighting requirements of Section 2-401 of the Aquatic Facility Regulations. Lighting specifications must be provided, and photometric plans may be required

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Barrier Requirements

From the time they are filled with water until the event is over and the venues emptied, temporary aquatic venues are required to have barriers meeting the requirements of Section 2-604 of the Aquatic Facility Regulations.

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Temporary Events

Temporary aquatic venues are utilized for short term, time limited, site specific events. Plan review for temporary venues is conducted in conjunction with special events.

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Heaters

Aquatic Venue heaters and boilers require a remodel application from SNHD to install. In addition, issuance of a boiler permit from the State of Nevada Mechanical Compliance Section may be required.

2019-05-28T15:53:05+00:00

Change of Permit Holder

Upon change of permit holder/ownership of an aquatic facility or aquatic venue, the new owner must apply for a health permit to the health district, per NRS 444.080, as well as the 2018 Aquatic Facility Regulations section 5-404

2019-05-28T15:52:21+00:00

New Construction & Major Remodels

Any aquatic facility owner planning to construct an aquatic venue, or planning to remodel an existing aquatic venue, must make application with SNHD and receive written approval prior to starting any work.

2019-05-28T15:55:30+00:00

Sous Vide – Supporting Documentation

As a method of documenting tasks, logs are a means of tracing production history. In HACCP plans, logs are used to document monitoring of critical limits for CCPs and other required food safety processes. These documents must be kept onsite for health authority review...

2019-05-29T11:44:52+00:00

Sous Vide HACCP Plan

A sous vide reduced oxygen packaging (ROP) process is one in which foods are placed into oxygen impermeable packages, the package is sealed to complete the oxygen barrier, and the food is cooked in the sealed packaging.

2019-05-29T11:35:45+00:00

Two-Barrier – Supporting Documentation

As a method of documenting tasks, logs are a means of tracing production history. In HACCP plans, logs are used to document monitoring of critical limits for CCPs and other required food safety processes. These documents must be kept onsite for health authority review, and the HACCP plan must provide details of log completion...

2019-05-29T15:39:37+00:00

Two-Barrier Reduced Oxygen Packaging HACCP Plan Guidance Document

A two-barrier reduced oxygen packaging (ROP) process is one in which raw or ready-to-eat foods are placed into oxygen impermeable package, a vacuum is pulled or the oxygen content is modified, and the package is sealed to complete the oxygen barrier. Food stored in this manner requires a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

2019-05-29T13:35:25+00:00

Two-Barrier HACCP Plan

A two-barrier reduced oxygen packaging (ROP) process is one in which raw or ready-to-eat foods are placed into oxygen impermeable packages, a vacuum is pulled or the oxygen content is modified, and the package is sealed to complete the oxygen barrier.

2019-05-22T11:01:04+00:00

Cook Chill – Additional Tips

Ensure to submit all required HACCP documents for review. See the Cook Chill HACCP Plan Checklist (Cook Chill Checklist 20190417) for details. Ensure all information (i.e. names of documents/logs, times, temperatures, etc.) is consistent throughout the HACCP plan

2019-05-20T16:31:48+00:00

Cook Chill HACCP Plan

A cook chill reduced oxygen packaging (ROP) process is one in which cooked foods are placed into oxygen impermeable packages and the package is sealed to complete the oxygen barrier. This type of ROP creates an anaerobic environment that can allow for the growth of anaerobic bacteria such as Clostridium botulinum and Listeria monocytogenes which are pathogens of concern that must be controlled for.

2019-05-22T10:47:11+00:00

Foodborne Illness Complaint Form

If you believe your illness was caused by eating at a commercial food establishment (restaurant, deli or caterer) complete the Foodborne Illness Complaint Form or call the Office of Epidemiology at (702) 759-1300. Provide your contact information so an investigator can follow up if more information is required.

2019-04-09T09:59:06+00:00

Developers

Restaurant/food establishment inspection data is now available to download. The data is helpful for developers who want a complete record [...]

2019-03-29T16:32:43+00:00

Think Risk Training Workbook

The Think Risk Training Workbook was developed to introduce basic food safety concepts to the regulated community and to help the person-in-charge of a food establishment to focus on control of the 5 foodborne illness risk factors

2019-07-19T16:25:17+00:00