/Zika Virus

Zika Virus

Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of mosquitoes. Prior 2015, Zika virus outbreaks have occurred in areas of Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands.

In May 2015, the Pan-American Health Organization issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infections in Brazil.

In 2016, the World Health Organization issued a Public Health Emergency regarding the virus.

Outbreaks have occurred in South America and Mexico as well as several nations in the Caribbean. Local transmission of Zika virus infection has occurred in Florida and Texas, as well as American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. In addition, there are cases of infection in the United States that are sexually transmitted.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued travel advisories that can be accessed here CDC Zika Travel Information As more people travel to countries impacted by Zika virus, it is likely that there will be more reported cases in the United States, including Nevada.

The Southern Nevada Health District’s Vector Surveillance program updated its methods to include surveillance for the mosquito species that carries Zika virus. On May 31, 2017, the Vector Surveillance Program identified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in Southern Nevada. Extended surveillance continues and to date, the mosquitoes have not tested positive for Zika virus.

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What is the aedes mosquito?2018-08-21T16:19:44+00:00

The Aedes aegypti mosquito has been identified in Clark County and can spread viruses like Zika, dengue, chikungunya.

Where was it found?2018-08-21T16:20:28+00:00

 

  • The Aedes mosquito species has been found in 89032 ZIP code. The Health District’s Vector Surveillance program has trapped and tested mosquitoes from this location. The identification of the mosquito in Clark County indicates that the mosquito can survive here. This is a new species identified in Nevada and one of the mosquitoes from the initial trapping is being sent to the CDC for species confirmation.
  • The identification of the mosquito in one part of Clark County does not mean that is the only place where it can be found.
  • The Health District advises everyone to eliminate breeding sources as a way to control the Aedes mosquito population no matter where you are located in Clark C

 

How many mosquitoes were found?2018-08-21T16:21:23+00:00

Three mosquitoes were found in the initial trap set. This is a new species identified in Nevada and one of the mosquitoes from the initial trapping is being sent to the CDC for species confirmation.

If they are found on one side of town, does it mean that there are no mosquitoes on the other side of town?2018-08-21T16:22:54+00:00
  • Mosquitoes can travel. Some can fly over a mile. Although Aedes aegypti are not strong fliers, it does not mean that they are not living in other parts of town.
  • The Health District recommends using all precautions to prevent mosquito bites and mosquito breeding no matter what part of Clark County you are living in.
What does it mean that the Aedes mosquitoes have been found here?2018-08-21T16:23:40+00:00

The Aedes mosquito can transmit viruses like Zika, dengue fever and chikungunya. If you have been to an area where any of these illnesses have been spreading, and you return home to Southern Nevada and are bitten by an Aedes mosquito, that mosquito can become a carrier of the virus. When it bites someone else in our community, the virus can now be spread to that person causing local transmission of the disease.

Does it mean more illness in the community?2018-08-21T16:29:44+00:00

  • The arrival of the Aedes mosquitoes in Clark County does not necessarily mean more illness in the community, but it means that there is opportunity for locally transmitted diseases like Zika, dengue fever and chikungunya. These three illnesses have been rare in the community and they have been generally acquired by individuals who have traveled to areas where they are more common.
  • Preventing mosquito bites and mosquito breeding can limit any disease spread in Southern Nevada.

How is the Aedes different from other mosquitoes?2018-08-21T16:28:40+00:00
  • Aedes mosquitoes are different in that they bite during the daytime hours. In some places, Aedes mosquitoes have been found living inside homes in addition to outside. Like other mosquito species, they breed in standing water.
  • Mosquitoes that transmit West Nile typically bite at dawn and dusk.
How do I know if I have the Aedes mosquitoes in my yard? Will the Health District test mosquitoes in my yard?2018-08-21T16:31:35+00:00

If you are experiencing mosquito activity, especially daytime biting mosquitoes at your home, please contact the Vector Surveillance Program at 702-759-1633.

How do I know if the mosquitoes at my house have Zika, West Nile or St. Louis Encephalitis or some other virus?2019-08-23T08:25:32+00:00

  • Unless mosquitoes are trapped by Vector Surveillance and tested at the Department of Agriculture, it would be impossible to determine if they are infected with the virus that causes illnesses such as Zika, St. Louis Encephalitis, West Nile or other mosquito-borne viruses.
  • Not all mosquitoes are infected but since many can transmit disease it is important to prevent mosquito bites. Use insect repellents and eliminate standing water and mosquito breeding spaces around your home.
  • The CDC www.cdc.gov and the Health District www.SNHD.info have information about eliminating mosquito breeding sites and other prevention measures on their websites.

What kinds of illnesses does the Aedes mosquito spread?2018-08-21T16:32:51+00:00
  • Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus can spread Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya diseases. While many people who are infected with Zika or chikungunya will not become sick or develop symptoms, some will. Zika virus has been found to be especially harmful to a developing fetus and can cause severe birth defects.
  • People who are infected with the virus that causes dengue fever can develop symptoms up to two weeks after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Symptoms often end in about one week. Sometimes symptoms can be severe and include intense stomach pain, repeated vomiting, bleeding from the nose/gums. Sometimes death can occur.
If I’m bitten by an Aedes mosquito, will I automatically get sick with Zika or one of the other diseases?2018-08-21T16:33:36+00:00
  • Not all mosquitoes carry diseases. Most people who are bitten by an Aedes or any other mosquito will not get sick or if they are bitten by an infected mosquito they will have only mild symptoms.
  • Symptoms for several mosquito-borne illnesses include headache, rash, fever, joint pain. If you have symptoms and you are concerned about them or if you are pregnant or want to become pregnant, you should check with your healthcare provider.
  • Only a blood or urine test can confirm for certain if you have been infected with Zika, dengue, and chikungunya.
If I live in an area or visit an area where mosquitoes with Zika have been reported and I am bitten am I likely to get sick?2018-08-22T07:45:16+00:00
  • While there is no way to tell for certain, a majority of people who become ill with Zika or other mosquito-borne viruses experience mild illness that lasts about a week. The current concern regarding Zika virus is its impact on pregnant women and women who are trying to become pregnant.
  • The CDC recommends that pregnant women or women who are trying to become pregnant should postpone travel to areas that are currently experiencing outbreaks.
How do I get rid of Aedes mosquitoes in my yard?2018-08-22T07:45:53+00:00
  • Mosquitoes only need about one cup of water to breed. The Health District recommends eliminating breeding sites around your yard. Toss out standing water from flower pots, tires, wading pools, pet dishes, and ornamental ponds and bird baths.
  • Check irrigation sites, drains, rain gutters for standing water.
  • The CDC www.cdc.gov and the Health District www.SNHD.info have information about eliminating mosquito breeding sites and other prevention measures on their websites.
Are they in other states?2018-08-22T07:46:38+00:00
  • The Aedes mosquito species has been found in several states including California and Arizona. In addition, it has been identified and spread illness in Florida and Texas as well as in Puerto Rico.
  • Both types of the Aedes mosquito have the potential to be found across the Southwestern United States, the Southeastern United States, the South, and the Northeast.
What is the Health District doing about Aedes mosquitoes?2018-08-22T07:47:21+00:00
  • The Health District’s Vector Surveillance program has been looking for this species of mosquito since 2014. In addition to Southern Nevada, this particular mosquito has been found in neighboring states. The Health District continues to urge residents to remove mosquito breeding areas, which can be obvious sources including abandoned swimming pools or hidden sources such as tires and other small backyard containers. Contact the Vector Surveillance Program at (702) 759-1633 to report mosquito activity. More information on the Health District’s Vector Surveillance Program can be found on the website at www.SNHD.info.
  • The Health District’s Vector Surveillance Program has put into place its plan to identify and control the Aedes mosquito population once it has been identified in the community.
  • The Health District purchased equipment and resources to treat areas where Aedes mosquitoes have been found. Treatment can include the use of insecticides that are safe for people and the environment to eliminate breeding sites.

For Additional Information

La información sobre el virus Zika en español está disponible en la página de internet del: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For the most up-to-date information, visit the CDC’s Zika site:

Zika and Pregnancy: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/index.html

Zika Transmission & Risks: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/transmission/index.html

Zika Symptoms/Diagnosis/Treatment: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/symptoms/index.html

Zika Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/index.html

Areas with Zika: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html

Zika FAQs: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/qa/index.html

Health Care Providers: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/index.html

Contact Information

Phone:
(702) 759-4636

Updated on: August 22, 2018

2018-08-22T07:51:31+00:00