Critical Violations

The nine items found in this section directly relate to one or more Food Borne Illness risk factors and are assessed five demerits each.

  1. Verifiable time as a control with approved procedure when in use. Operational plan, waiver or variance approved and followed when required. Operating within the parameters of the health permit.
    • Risk factors of concern: Improper holding, time and temperature. The risk factor of concern for an operational plan, waiver or variance will vary depending upon the subject matter and more than one risk factor may be of concern. This also applies to operating within the parameters of the health permit.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance:
      • Time alone used as a microbial growth barrier. A facility must have a written procedure with copies maintained at the food establishment. Employees must be knowledgeable with the procedure and carrying it out properly. The food product must be time labeled and disposed when time has expired. 3-501.19
      • The person-in-charge (PIC) must be knowledgeable of the parameters of the health permit issuance and, if applicable, the requirements of any operational plan, waiver or variance. Before making modifications to the facility, equipment changes, or significant changes to the operation, contact the health district. 4-101
  2. Hand washing (as required, when required, proper glove use, no bare hand contact of ready to eat foods). Food handler health restrictions as required.
    • Risk factors of concern: Poor personal hygiene – improper hand washing and/or not washing hands when necessary.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Train food handlers on when and how to properly wash their hands. Actively monitor employee practices to assure proper hand washing takes place. 2-301.12
    • Risk factors of concern: Poor personal hygiene – bare hand contact with ready-to-eat foods.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Procedures must be in place as to how food handlers are expected to prepare and dispense ready-to-eat foods and practices need to be monitored. 3-301.11 3-304.15

    • Risk factors of concern: Poor personal hygiene – foodservice employees working while sick with symptoms, such as vomiting, diarrhea, sore throat with fever, jaundice or infected cuts or burns on hands and wrists.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Monitor food handlers for injuries or illnesses that may spread to your customers. Remove identified staff from food handling positions to reduce the risk of disease transmission. 2-201
  3. Commercially manufactured food from approved source with required labels. Parasite destruction as required. Potentially hazardous foods/time temperature control for safety (PHF/TCS) received at proper temperature.
    • Risk factors of concern: Food from unapproved food sources and/or prepared in unpermitted locations. Receipt of adulterated food.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Verify the source of all foods purchased. Foods from unapproved sources have not been inspected for safety. Home kitchens are not approved for foodservice to the public. They seldom have the equipment necessary to prepare large volumes of food safely and the food may be subject to contamination by pets, people and other contaminates. 3-201
    • Risk factors of concern: Parasite destruction falls under improper cooking temperatures/methods since the freezing process kills parasites that may be present.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: The PIC must know the source of fish the facility plans to serve raw or undercooked, know if it requires freezing for parasite destruction and, if required, know if it was done by the distributor or will be done by the facility. Proper records to verify parasite destruction must be maintained. 3-402.11 3-402.12
    • Risk factors of concern: Receiving food product at proper temperature falls under improper holding, time and temperature, specifically, improper hot and cold holding of potentially hazardous food (PHF).Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Procedures must be in place to assure food is received at proper temperatures. 3-202
  4. Hot and cold running water from approved source as required.
    • Risk factors of concern: Food contamination, poor personal hygiene and food from unsafe sources.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance:
      • Water must be from an approved source in sufficient capacity to meet the needs of the food establishment. 5-101 5-102
      • Hot and cold running water are required at all sinks. Monitor water temperatures. The hot water supply must deliver a minimum of 120°F to ware-washing, prep and utility sinks. 5-102.13
      • For hand sinks the minimum water temperature is 100°F. 5-202.11
      • Lack of hot water at a facility constitutes an imminent health hazard. Contact the health district and self close if necessary.
  5. No imminently dangerous cross connection or backflow. Waste water and sewage disposed into a public sewer or approved facility.
    • Risk factors of concern: Food contamination.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Raw sewage contains virtually all of the bacteria known to cause illnesses in people. Leaving a facility in operation under these circumstances may result in foodborne illnesses, closures and fees. In the event of a sewage back up, immediately self-close your facility and notify the health district. To prevent drainage issues, implement a regular maintenance program for drain lines and grease interceptors. 5-205 5-4
  6. Food wholesome; not spoiled, contaminated or adulterated.
    • Risk factors of concern: Food from unapproved sources.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: This is where actual contamination is seen and food product is observed to be spoiled, contaminated or adulterated. Procedures must be in place to assure foods are wholesome and free of spoilage. Monitor stock rotation and expiration dates. Inspect all food containers for damage. Store items to be returned for credit in a clearly marked area separate from, and below foods intended for use. General rule of thumb; whenever the quality of a food is in doubt, throw it out. 3-301.11 3-202 3-302 3-306.14 3-307 3-501.17 3-701
  7. PHF/TCSs cooked and reheated to proper temperatures.
    • Risk factors of concern: Improper cooking temperatures/methods – cooking. The PIC must assure that food handlers know final cooking and reheating temperatures as it applies to their job responsibilities and that active monitoring is taking place, such as use of a stem thermometer, to ensure that foods meet the minimum safe cooking temperatures. Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Cooking temperatures are based on the temperatures required to reduce bacteria to a safe level in the foods we eat. Different raw PHF have different levels and types of bacteria living in them and must be cooked to different temperatures. If you fail to reach these temperatures for the time required, some of the bacteria may survive and make your customers ill. 3-401
    • Risk factors of concern: Improper cooking temperatures/methods – reheatingStrategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Proper reheating of PHF for hot holding kills vegetative bacteria that may have grown during the cooling process. 3-403
  8. PHF/TCSs properly cooled.
    • Risk factors of concern: Improper holding, time and temperature – improper cooling of PHF.Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Procedures must be in place to assure PHF is cooled from 135°F to 70°F in two hours or less, then from 70°F to 41°F in an additional four hours. Active monitoring of the process should take place to assure the procedure is working. 3-501.14 3-501.15Safe cooling practices are essential. Some bacteria produce spores that can survive boiling for several hours. Once foods containing spores are heated, the spores become active and begin to reproduce. Cross contamination may also occur after cooking, which may add bacteria to the food. If foods are cooled improperly the bacteria have time to reproduce and possibly produce toxins, which may make your customers sick.
  9. PHF/TCSs at proper temperatures during storage, display, service, transport, and holding.
    • Risk factors of concern: Improper holding, time and temperature – improper hot and cold holding of potentially hazardous food (PHF)Strategies to control the risk factor and stay in compliance: Bacteria grow best between 41° and 135°F. Having PHF in this temperature range for unknown timeframes allows bacteria to reproduce, which can make your customers ill. Procedures must be in place to monitor PHF hot and cold holding temperatures. Staff must be trained on safe holding temperatures and supervised to assure foods are not left out for longer than necessary during preparation. Active monitoring must take place to assure safe holding temperatures. 3-501.16

View major violations.

Contact Information

Phone: (702) 759-0588

Email: environmentalhealth@snhd.org

 

Updated on: June 28, 2019